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-   -   HELP: How to take sharp and clear Potrait shoot? (http://www.shutterasia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35831)

wesleylsk 09-27-2009 11:09 PM

HELP: How to take sharp and clear Potrait shoot?
 
Hi all,

I need your all professional advise and guidance for my problem.

How to take sharp and clear Potrait shoot?
It is due to any adjustment of F and S problem?
What is the suitable F, S , ISO for potrait?
Which mode most suitable for potrait? because normally i use A mode.
It is because of lens or camera setting, then make my photo not sharp?
I want the person face look sharp and clear, please help.

My gear:
Nikon D90
Nikkor VR G 18 - 105MM Kit Lens


Example of photos:

http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/v...C_0045copy.jpg

http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/v...C_0100copy.jpg

Thanks a lot.

ND40 09-27-2009 11:34 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Question 1: Focus the right place and Shake FREE!!

Question 2: As f number increased (higher f), it will increase the depth of focus, and have sharper picture. most of the lenses have sharpest f number @ 8-16.

Question 3: you need to define what you want.... more background??? less background? as f number goes higher, the depth of focus will increased..

Question 4: The mode that you comfortable with. Most of us will stay with A as we want to decide the DOF and let the camera do the job for shutter speed...

Question 5: I believed any gear that you used can produce sharp pictures. Maybe some post processing is needed. I do agree some expensive lens can produce sharper picture but if your basic is not strong enough, any lens will just the same to you at the end of the day...

Lastly, you shoot in raw or jpeg? Quality fine + largest file? It is always advised to shoot in raw!!

I had sharpen it a little in photoshop...but seem like no difference. Sorry that my skill not reach home yet..
Attachment 56068

orionmystery 09-27-2009 11:40 PM

Why use ISO 500 in such broad day light?

The shutter speeds you used were 1/2000, and 1/3200....fast to enough to freeze most motion.

Both such high ISO and SS were a waste imho.

Did you shoot in RAW or JPG? Was the original images not sharp as well or you only the resized ones not sharp?

Those look reasonably sharp to be but of course a bit more sharpening will help....could use a bit more contrast too.

wesleylsk 09-28-2009 12:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ND40 (Post 336217)
Question 1: Focus the right place and Shake FREE!!

Question 2: As f number increased (higher f), it will increase the depth of focus, and have sharper picture. most of the lenses have sharpest f number @ 8-16.

Question 3: you need to define what you want.... more background??? less background? as f number goes higher, the depth of focus will increased..

Question 4: The mode that you comfortable with. Most of us will stay with A as we want to decide the DOF and let the camera do the job for shutter speed...

Question 5: I believed any gear that you used can produce sharp pictures. Maybe some post processing is needed. I do agree some expensive lens can produce sharper picture but if your basic is not strong enough, any lens will just the same to you at the end of the day...

Lastly, you shoot in raw or jpeg? Quality fine + largest file? It is always advised to shoot in raw!!

I had sharpen it a little in photoshop...but seem like no difference. Sorry that my skill not reach home yet..
Attachment 56068

Thanks a lot for your advise.
I want backgroud more blur, so I adjust f to smaller but because my kit lens f is f3.5- f5.6,so once I zoom in to get person look bigger, f will increase automatically, make my background not enough blur. Any advise on this?

I used A mode, but the camera will auto adjust S speed, do we stil need monitor S speed again? In case the S speed is too fast or too slow.

These photo I shoot in both RAW and JPEG with fine format, so what is the reason we must use RAW format?

Quote:

Originally Posted by orionmystery (Post 336224)
Why use ISO 500 in such broad day light?

The shutter speeds you used were 1/2000, and 1/3200....fast to enough to freeze most motion.

Both such high ISO and SS were a waste imho.

Did you shoot in RAW or JPG? Was the original images not sharp as well or you only the resized ones not sharp?

Those look reasonably sharp to be but of course a bit more sharpening will help....could use a bit more contrast too.

The S speed is auto generate by camera because I am using A mode, i also dont know why it adjust to such fast?

The ISO I also put auto ISO adjustment, it is correct?

I shoot in both RAW and JPEG format. Ya, the original image is not sharp and I just resized it.

ND40 09-28-2009 12:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wesleylsk (Post 336243)
Thanks a lot for your advise.
I want backgroud more blur, so I adjust f to smaller but because my kit lens f is f3.5- f5.6,so once I zoom in to get person look bigger, f will increase automatically, make my background not enough blur. Any advise on this?

I used A mode, but the camera will auto adjust S speed, do we stil need monitor S speed again? In case the S speed is too fast or too slow.

These photo I shoot in both RAW and JPEG with fine format, so what is the reason we must use RAW format?

why raw??? uhm... because
Quote:

jpeg capture 256 brightness level for each color (RGB). while raw have many more... 16,384 per channel is command.
- Digital SLR Photography Magazine

actually, you need more understanding on your gear. The more you zoom (tele or long end), you will get more background blur aka bokeh. Alternatively you need to reduce f-number which is larger aperture setting...

All gears have limitation. so you just got to work with it. If you want background blur with your kit lens, be selective on your background. The further the background, the more b/ground blur you get. Be familiar with your gears.

As the rule of thumb for S, we use 1/focal length X crop factor. For example, u zoom to max 105mm, 1/ 105mm X 1.5 (D90 is 1.5 crop) = 1/157.5.

u need about 1/160 or faster to eliminate the shake!! As for iso, it is better to stay as lowest as you can. Take more control of your camera, try to use iso200 as that is the lowest iso you can go for D90. Higher iso may cause picture to lost details and increase noise level.

by the way, you had double post. Try to use the multi-quote @ the bottom right. the one with "+ sign. So that you won't get infection from admin.

azmeen 09-28-2009 02:47 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Other than the high ISO mentioned earlier, I find that the focus was already wrong in the first place. IMHO, this is the root cause of your problem.

For example in the first pic, the belt area of the girl seems more in focus than the eyes.

Pic 2 is not bad in terms of focus. Unfortunately the faces have dark shadow casts.

Attached are my quick fixed versions...

Attachment 56095

By simply adjusting the curves for strong contrast, it boosts the mood of the image quite a bit. More importantly, it also removes the greyish colour cast that's apparent in the original.

Attachment 56096

Same curves adjustment as the first pic. However, I applied some minor dodge to the faces (30px brush size, range: highlights, exposure 50%) to kill off some of the shadow casts.

All adjustments using Photoshop... but I'm sure there are similar tools in other decent photo editing software too.

goldfries 09-28-2009 05:01 AM

maybe you could just upload the original JPG file and let us see whether it's really not sharp or you're having unrealistic expectations. :D

from the photos so far, it looks reasonable.

one thing I noticed was your shot was taken at 105mm (EXIF data shows #
# Focal Length in 35mm Film = 157)

I'm not sure about the 18-105VR but maybe you should go to say somewhere within your 50mm to 80mm range of the lens to get better sharpness. Lenses are often soft at the longest zoom point.

tools4fools 09-28-2009 07:35 AM

focus: on eye (that is closer to camera if person looking side ways).
f-stop as discussed already, 5,6-8 should get sharpest results
use tele to get more blur in background and:
- go closer to person...as in tip-tap-toe...just go closer...
- put bigger distance between background and person...

ShaolinTiger 09-28-2009 03:41 PM

Shoot at around 70mm, f/8, make sure focus point is on the eyes, use ISO200, don't shoot into the sun if you don't know how to control flare.

Make sure your front element/back element and filter is clean.

Steven Chen 09-28-2009 04:44 PM

18-105 VR is a fantastic lense with great sharpness throughout whole focal range. I think the problem is on your camera setting. Default sharpness on D90 tend to be soft, increase the sharpness and lower EV, seems that your photo is over exposed instead of soft focusing. :)


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